Master’s Program (M.S.N.)

Aims and Assumptions

The master’s curriculum is designed to offer students an opportunity to become prepared as practitioners in selected specialties and in evidence-based research so that they may assume roles as clinician-scholars. Nurses in advanced practice are professionals committed to the delivery and study of high-quality clinical service: responsible, accountable, and with the authority to help shape the health care system of the future. The program of study in the School is viewed as preparation for a variety of leadership roles.

The Yale School of Nursing admits both registered nurses who have a baccalaureate degree and college graduates with no previous nursing education. The graduate nurse moves directly into a chosen area of specialization. The full-time student who is a registered nurse is expected to complete the requirements for the degree in two academic years; part-time study is also available. The Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) for the college graduate who is not a nurse requires two terms and one summer session in addition to the two-year specialization sequence; full-time study is required for GEPN students throughout the prespecialty year.

The master’s curriculum places emphasis upon clinical competence and nursing scholarship. Each student is educated to function in an expanded role in the specialty area of the student’s choice. Employers recognize the superior preparation Yale School of Nursing graduates receive and actively seek to recruit them.

Requirements for the Degree

The degree of Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) is conferred upon students who have satisfactorily completed the chosen course of graduate study at Yale and have met the other conditions prescribed by the School of Nursing. To be eligible for the degree, students in the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) must successfully complete a minimum of 80.8 credit hours* and have passed the National Council Licensure Examination—Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN), which is taken at the end of the prespecialty year. Students who are registered nurses satisfactorily complete a program of study that includes a minimum of 40 credit hours to be eligible for the degree.

Transfer credits are not accepted; however, selected courses may be waived based on review and approval by faculty.

*One hour of credit per term is given for each hour of classroom work per week; one hour of credit per term is given for three hours of clinical work per week.

General Enrollment Information

New students are enrolled in the master’s program only once per year (in August). Fall and spring terms are sixteen weeks in length, and the summer term is eleven weeks long. All students are required to maintain active Connecticut R.N. licensure and Basic Life Support (BLS) for the Healthcare Professional certification through the American Heart Association while enrolled in the School of Nursing. (GEPN students are to obtain their Connecticut R.N. license during the first term of their specialty year.) Full-time study is required for GEPN students in the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing and is offered in all specialties. R.N.s have the option of full- or part-time study. The course schedule for part-time study is predetermined and will be dependent upon the specialty. General descriptions of the part-time study schedule can be obtained from the School’s website. Conversion from part-time to full-time study or the reverse is not normally permitted.

Nonmatriculated part-time study is available with the course instructor’s written permission. A nonmatriculated student is limited to three courses per term. Students are permitted to apply up to six courses toward a degree program or a post-master’s certificate at the discretion of the specialty director and associate dean of student affairs.

Admission Requirements and Application Procedures for the Master’s Program

The minimum requirement for admission to the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) is a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. No specific major is required, but collegiate courses in human anatomy, human physiology, statistics, and biophysical sciences are strongly recommended.

Admissions requirements for registered nurses include a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and graduation from a school of nursing (approved by the licensing board of the state in which it is located). A course in statistics and research methods is recommended, but not required. Additionally, at least one year of professional nursing experience is highly recommended. Applicants must be licensed to practice nursing in at least one U.S. state. If the applicant is a new graduate, steps to obtain a Connecticut R.N. license must be in process at the time the applicant enters the program and must be completed no later than November 1.

The following application materials are required:

  1. Online application form
  2. Nonrefundable application fee ($100)
  3. Résumé/curriculum vitae
  4. Personal statement/essay
  5. One official transcript from each college or university attended (Note: Applicants with an international degree transcript must submit a course-by-course evaluation conducted by a credentialing agency such as World Education Services [www.wes.org] or Educational Credential Evaluators [www.ece.org]. In addition, a certified English translation must accompany all non-English transcripts.)
  6. Three letters of recommendation (academic or professional)
  7. Graduate Record Examination-General Test (GRE) (see below for additional information)
  8. TOEFL or IELTS for applicants whose native/primary language is not English (see below for additional information)

Application information is available online at https://apply.nursing.yale.edu/apply. Program information can be obtained by visiting http://nursing.yale.edu/admissions; by writing to the Office of Admissions, Yale School of Nursing, Yale University West Campus, PO Box 27399, West Haven CT 06516-0974; or by calling 203.737.1793.

The deadline for GEPN applicants is October 1. All application materials must be received by the YSN Office of Admissions by this date. Applications submitted after October 1 will not be considered for admission in the upcoming fall term.

The deadline for R.N. applicants is November 1. All application materials must be received by the YSN Office of Admissions by this date. Applications submitted after November 1 will not be considered for admission in the upcoming fall term. The application procedure and deadlines are the same for both part-time and full-time study.

Applications will be reviewed only after all application materials, including the GRE, are received by the above deadlines. Incomplete applications are not forwarded to the Admissions Committee for consideration. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all materials are received by the Office of Admissions in a timely manner. Materials must be received by October 1 for GEPNs and November 1 for R.N.s.

Following the initial review of written credentials, qualified applicants are invited to the School for an interview. When distance presents a hardship, candidates are able to arrange a telephone interview. Please visit the School’s website for details on interview dates.

Admission decisions are based upon a number of variables, which include evidence of motivation, academic ability, personal understanding of and propensity for advanced practice nursing, letters of recommendation, and potential for continued constructive use of the professional education. For clinical placement purposes, all accepted applicants will be required to undergo a background check before enrolling in the fall.

Reapplication Policy

Applicants to the Yale School of Nursing who have applied three times to the same program without an offer of admission will not be allowed to apply to that program again.

Graduate Record Examination

All applicants are required to take the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Test scores must be submitted electronically by the Educational Testing Service. The YSN GRE code is 3998. Scores that are more than five years old are not acceptable. Additionally, the GRE requirement cannot be waived based on prior GPA or academic achievement. Please contact the Office of Admissions for additional details.

GEPN applicants must take the GRE prior to the October 1 application deadline. R.N. applicants must take the GRE prior to the November 1 application deadline. In most cases, computer-based testing has replaced the paper format and can be scheduled year-round in the United States. International students must plan carefully, as the GRE may only be offered once a year in a specific country. It takes approximately 7–10 business days from the date of a computerized administration for the official transcript of GRE scores to reach the School. Paper-based GRE results may take two months to reach the School. Prompt arrangements for taking this examination should be made in order to meet the application deadlines for receipt of scores.

Examinations are scheduled at specific times in centers located throughout the United States and many other countries. Information about the examination may be obtained by visiting www.ets.org/gre; by contacting Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service, PO Box 6000, Princeton NJ 08541-6000; or by telephoning 609.771.7670.

English as a Foreign Language

Applicants whose native/primary language is other than English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the academic version of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) as one of the admission requirements. This requirement cannot be waived based on college or university attendance in the United States or other English-speaking country. The following scores are required for admission to the M.S.N. programs:

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) minimum score: 100/120 total, with minimum section scores of Reading, 22/30; Listening, 22/30; Writing, 22/30; and Speaking, 24/30.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) minimum score: Band 7.0/9.0 total, with no section score below Band 6.5/9.0.

Arrangements to take the TOEFL must be made online at www.ets.org/toefl.

Arrangements to take the academic IELTS must be made online at www.ielts.org.

It typically takes a month from the date of administration for the official transcript of scores to reach the School. Prompt arrangements for taking an English examination should be made in order to meet the appropriate application deadline for receipt of scores.

Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) Examination

Prior to enrolling in the School, graduates of foreign schools of nursing must pass the CGFNS Qualifying Exam as well as the NCLEX-RN examination in order to become a registered nurse (R.N.) in the United States. Several states, however, do not require successful completion of the CGFNS Qualifying Exam in order to take the NCLEX-RN. Information on the CGFNS Qualifying Exam can be obtained from the United States Embassy, the nurses’ association in the foreign country of residence, or www.cgfns.org. Information on the NCLEX-RN examination is available online at www.ncsbn.org/nclex.

Core Performance Standards for Admission and Progression

To complete most of the nursing programs at the Yale School of Nursing, a student must complete a clinical/practicum component that involves caring for actual patients. By accepting admission and enrolling in the School of Nursing, students certify that they have read and understand the essential eligibility requirements of the program.

Essential eligibility requirements for participation and completion by students in the nursing program include the following core performance standards:

Intellectual Critical thinking ability sufficient for clinical and academic judgment.

Interpersonal Interpersonal ability sufficient to appropriately interact with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds.

Communication Communication abilities sufficient for professional interaction with others in oral, written, and computer-assisted forms.

Mobility Physical abilities sufficient to move from room to room and maneuver in small spaces.

Motor skills Gross and fine motor abilities sufficient to provide therapeutic nursing interventions that are safe and effective and that maintain safety and security standards.

Attendance The ability to get to required classes and clinical assignments, be on time, and complete all required course work and clinical shifts.

Hearing Auditory ability sufficient to monitor, assess, and respond to health needs.

Visual Visual ability sufficient to monitor, assess, and respond to health needs.

Tactile Tactile ability sufficient to monitor, assess, and respond to health needs.

Judgment Mental and physical ability to demonstrate good judgment in decision-making, in order to maintain safety and security of patients and to behave appropriately with patients, staff, students, and supervisors.

YSN does not discriminate on the basis of disability. If reasonable accommodations will allow an otherwise qualified student with a disability to meet the essential eligibility requirements for participation in its nursing programs, the School will assist the student in making the reasonable accommodations. Students who would like to receive accommodations on the basis of disability must self-identify, must provide documentation of the disability, and must request accommodation. Please refer to the Yale University Resource Office on Disabilities’ website at http://rod.yale.edu.

Curriculum

The master’s curriculum is organized by specialty. The first year of the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing is described separately.

All course descriptions are listed in numerical order in the chapter Courses. Required courses for each specialty are listed in the description of each specialty. The listings describe schedules for full-time study. The course plan for scheduled part-time study may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs (OSA). The School reserves the right to offer course substitutions and to amend the overall curriculum.

Fall-term courses are noted by “a” following the course number, spring-term courses by “b,” and summer-term courses by “c.” Yearlong courses have no letter designation.

Elective courses: Students may elect School of Nursing courses offered by specialties other than the one in which they are enrolled or by other schools or departments within Yale University, with the permission of the course instructor and their specialty director. For nonspecialty-affiliated School of Nursing electives, see the chapter School of Nursing Electives for Matriculated and Nonmatriculated Students.

Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing

The Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) is a one-year, full-time course of study focused on preparation in basic nursing, followed by two years of study in the School’s master’s program in an evidence-based specialty. The first year of the program of study is designed to provide a solid foundation in basic nursing theory, nursing process, biological science, nutrition, and pharmacology. This content is reinforced by clinical experience in medical-surgical, pediatric, psychiatric–mental health, maternal-newborn, and community health nursing settings. The curriculum also includes courses that address current issues in nursing interprofessional collaboration and teamwork, and health assessment. The prespecialty year must be completed full-time over the course of two consecutive terms and one summer session term.

Upon completion of the prespecialty year, the student moves into a specialty and continues with the study of relevant nursing theory, practice, and research. The specialty portion is a full-time, two-year program; part-time study is available during the specialty years. Students are admitted into a designated specialty when accepted into the GEPN program, and changes in specialty are not allowed.

The Certificate in Nursing is awarded upon successful completion of all required courses and experiences in the prespecialty year, but it is not intended as an exit point. The Certificate in Nursing satisfies Connecticut General Statutes requirements, allowing the student to become eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Students are required to pass the NCLEX-RN and submit proof of their Connecticut RN licensure by the last day of classes of the first term of their specialty program of study. The Certificate in Nursing and a license to practice nursing in Connecticut are two prerequisites for enrollment in the second term of the first specialty year.

In addition to courses taken in their required plan of study, students may take electives offered by the School of Nursing, the Graduate School, and other professional schools within the University.

The First Year of the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing

Fall Term
  • 503a, Biomedical Foundations of Health and Disease
  • 504a, Advanced Health Assessment
  • 506a, Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience
  • 509a, Introduction to Drug Therapy
  • 511a, Clinical Applications of Human Anatomy
  • 516a, Clinical Practice in Medical-Surgical Nursing
  • 517a, Seminar in Medical-Surgical Nursing
Spring and Summer Terms
  • 501b, Issues in Nursing
  • 503b, Biomedical Foundations of Health and Disease
  • 504b, Advanced Health Assessment
  • 506b, Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience
  • 513c, Community Health Nursing and Public Health
  • 514b or c, Clinical Practice in Maternal-Newborn Nursing
  • 515b or c, Seminar in Maternal-Newborn Nursing
  • 517b, Seminar in Medical-Surgical Nursing
  • 518b or c, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Nursing
  • 519b or c, Seminar in Pediatric Nursing
  • 520b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing
  • 521b, Seminar in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing

Master in Nursing Specialties

The master’s program is designed to prepare advanced practice nurses to provide high-quality evidence-based care, to engage in scholarly inquiry, and to be leaders in the profession. The first year includes assessment of clinical skill development, foundational knowledge in pathophysiology of common diseases, and principles of evidence-based practice. The final year provides advanced clinical management skills, role development, integration of practice and policy theory, and leadership.* Students are expected to remain in the specialty to which they were accepted.

The specialties offered in the master’s program are (1) Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner; (2) Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner; (3) Family Nurse Practitioner; (4) Midwifery and/or Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner; (5) Pediatric Nurse Practitioner; and (6) Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. Each student is assigned a faculty adviser who is a clinical expert in the student’s chosen field of specialization. Within the specialty area, emphasis is placed upon the development of clinical judgment. In addition to clinical experience, conferences with individual faculty advisers, group conferences with specialty faculty members, and courses presenting scientific data and content relevant to the specialty area provide opportunity for in-depth study. In their final year, students may also have an opportunity to pursue clinical concentrations in the areas of diabetes, oncology, and global health. Students will be required to have access to transportation for their clinical site placements.

The following is a list of core courses for all specialties of the master’s program. In addition, each specialty requires specific didactic and clinical courses, which are listed in the plans of study for each specialty. Course descriptions can be found in the chapter Courses.

*In fall 2017 the School implemented its new curriculum. Students will be placed in a variety of clinical experiences and may have clinical sites away from the State of Connecticut.

Core Courses

  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students (required of incoming RNs only)
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses*

The required research methods and evidence-based practice courses in the first year of specialization provide the foundation for evidence-based, patient-centered care.

The curriculum of specialties is intended to prepare students to apply for certification through credentialing agencies. Please note that there is no program in the nation that can meet each state’s individual certification requirements. The School recommends that students review all state requirements and consult their academic adviser to plan how they can meet those requirements while enrolled in the School.

*Not a core course for adult/gerontology acute care, pediatric, and psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students.

Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AGACNP) specialty prepares acute care nurse practitioners to assess and manage collaboratively the needs of patients who are acutely and critically ill across the full continuum of adult acute care services. The core body of knowledge provided in the specialty is derived from the full spectrum of high-acuity patient care needs. The population focus is adult/gerontology. The AGACNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for the Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

In the first year of study, the focus is on history taking, physical assessment, differential diagnosis, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and management of patients. Courses in assessing the acutely ill individual, diagnostic reasoning, nursing theory, research, and statistics are also featured in the first year. Clinical conferences focus on the diagnosis and management of problems seen in acutely ill patients, as well as pharmacology.

During the final year of study, emphasis is placed on the differential diagnosis and management of complex problems seen in the acutely ill patient population. Courses also include content on specialty pharmacology, health promotion, acute and chronic disease management, and the role of the nurse practitioner. Clinical placement sites expose the student to a variety of acute care settings and patient populations. Clinical conferences focus on the diagnosis and management of complex acute care problems.

Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 780a, Advanced Health Assessment in Adult/Gerontology Acute Care
  • 781a, Advanced Diagnostics in Acute Care Seminar
  • 782a, Critical Care Clinical Immersion
  • Spring Term
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 783b, Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems Seminar I
  • 784b, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice I
  • 788b, Advanced Acute Care Pharmacology
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 785a, Pathophysiology and Management of Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Health Problems Seminar II
  • 786a, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice II
  • Spring Term
  • 787b, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Clinical Practice III

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGPCNP) specialty emphasizes primary care of the entire adult-older adult age spectrum from wellness to illness across a variety of health care settings. The population of AGPCNP practice includes young adults (late adolescents and emancipated minors), adults, and older adults. The AGPCNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 700a, Advanced Specialty Health Assessment
  • 701a, Individual and Family Development during Adulthood
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 703a, Primary Care I Seminar B
  • 720a, Women’s Health I Seminar
  • 744a, Primary Care of Adolescents Seminar
  • Spring Term
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 704b, Primary Care II Seminar
  • 705b, Primary Care II Clinical Practice
  • 711b, Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Pharmacology
  • 723b, Women’s Health III Seminar
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses
  • 706a, Primary Care III Seminar
  • 707a, Primary Care III Clinical Practice
  • Spring Term
  • 709b, Primary Care IV Clinical Practice
  • 710b, Aging in the United States

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director.

Family Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) specialty emphasizes the primary care of newborns, infants, children, adolescents, adults, pregnant and postpartum women, and older adults within the context of family-centered care. The FNP curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Family Nurse Practitioner Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 700a, Advanced Specialty Health Assessment
  • 701a, Individual and Family Development during Adulthood
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 703a, Primary Care I Seminar B
  • 720a, Women’s Health I Seminar
  • 741a, Individual and Family Development during Childhood
  • 742a, Primary Care and Health Promotion of Children I Seminar
  • 744a, Primary Care of Adolescents Seminar
  • Spring Term
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 704b, Primary Care II Seminar
  • 705b, Primary Care II Clinical Practice
  • 711b, Advanced FNP/AGPCNP Pharmacology
  • 723b, Women’s Health III Seminar
  • 746b, Primary Care of Children II Seminar
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses
  • 706a, Primary Care III Seminar
  • 707a, Primary Care III Clinical Practice
  • 748a, Primary Care of Children III Seminar
  • Spring Term
  • 709b, Primary Care IV Clinical Practice
  • 750b, Primary Care of Children IV Seminar

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner (M/WHNP) curriculum is designed to prepare clinically competent midwives and women’s health nurse practitioners who provide family-centered primary health care to women. Clinical experiences with individuals and groups, incorporated throughout the two years, emphasize use of a management process for providing health care. Relevant research and concepts from midwifery, nursing, medicine, and the sciences are studied to provide a base of theory and rationale for clinical practice and primary care. Students are expected to examine their midwifery and nursing practice critically and to develop beginning skill in the use and evaluation of research methods and statistics. Leadership capabilities are emphasized.

Courses and clinical work focus on the independent management of primary care; care for women and newborns during pregnancy, birth, and postpartum periods; and family planning and gynecological care. Students learn collaborative, interdisciplinary management of the care of women and newborns with health complications. Clinical practice takes place within health care systems that provide for medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral in accord with the Standards for Nurse-Midwifery Practice promulgated by the American College of Nurse-Midwives. The curriculum meets the Core Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice promulgated by the American College of Nurse-Midwives and the Population-Focused Competencies for Women’s Health/Gender-Related Nurse Practitioners from the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Elective and independent study courses offer opportunities for students to pursue individual educational and professional goals. Completion of the M/WHNP curriculum qualifies students for the national certification examination offered by the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB) and the Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner certification offered by the National Certification Corporation (NCC) for the obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing specialties.

The M/WHNP program of study is fully accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Midwifery Education, www.midwife.org/Accreditation; and by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation.

Students may choose to complete the master’s degree to pursue certification in both midwifery (AMCB) and women’s health nurse practitioner (NCC) roles (dual specialty option is available for classes of 2019 and 2020 only); or students may choose to pursue only midwifery certification or only women’s health nurse practitioner certification.

Courses required for dual certification as a midwife and a women’s health nurse practitioner:
Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 703a, Primary Care I Seminar B
  • 705a, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 720a, Women’s Health I Seminar
  • 721a, Women’s Health II Seminar
  • 722a, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • Spring and Summer Terms
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 704b, Primary Care II Seminar
  • 705b or c, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 722b, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • 723b, Women’s Health III Seminar
  • 724b, Women’s Health IV Seminar
  • 725b or c, Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice
  • 726b, Childbearing Care I Seminar
  • 727b or c, Childbearing Care I Clinical Practice
  • 734b, Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 705a, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 728a, Women’s Health V Seminar
  • 729a, Women’s Health V Clinical Practice
  • 730a, Childbearing Care II Seminar
  • 731a, Childbearing Care II Clinical Practice
  • Spring Term
  • 705b, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 732b, Integration of Midwifery Care
  • 733b, Integration of Women’s Health Care

*705 may be taken in any term of the student’s course of study.

†722 may be taken in the fall or spring term of the student’s first year.

Courses required for certification as a midwife:
Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 703a, Primary Care I Seminar B
  • 720a, Women’s Health I Seminar
  • 721a, Women’s Health II Seminar
  • 722a, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • Spring and Summer Terms
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 704b, Primary Care II Seminar
  • 722b, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • 723b, Women’s Health III Seminar
  • 724b, Women’s Health IV Seminar
  • 725b or c, Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice
  • 726b, Childbearing Care I Seminar
  • 727b or c, Childbearing Care I Clinical Practice
  • 734b, Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 728a, Women’s Health V Seminar
  • 729a, Women’s Health V Clinical Practice
  • 730a, Childbearing Care II Seminar
  • 731a, Childbearing Care II Clinical Practice
  • Spring Term
  • 732b, Integration of Midwifery Care
  • 733b, Integration of Women’s Health Care

†722 may be taken in the fall or spring term of the student’s first year.

Courses required for certification as a women’s health nurse practitioner:
Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 607a, Mental Health Management Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 703a, Primary Care I Seminar B
  • 705a, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 720a, Women’s Health I Seminar
  • 721a, Women’s Health II Seminar
  • 722a, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • Spring and Summer Terms
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 704b, Primary Care II Seminar
  • 705b or c, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 722b, Women’s Health I and II Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Practice†
  • 723b, Women’s Health III Seminar
  • 724b, Women’s Health IV Seminar
  • 725b or c, Women’s Health III and IV Clinical Practice
  • 734b, Midwifery and Women’s Health Pharmacology
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 705a, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 728a, Women’s Health V Seminar
  • 729a, Women’s Health V Clinical Practice
  • Spring Term
  • 705b, Primary Care II Clinical Practice*
  • 733b, Integration of Women’s Health Care

*705 may be taken in any term of a student’s course of study.

†722 may be taken in the fall or spring term of the student’s first year.

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director.

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) specialty prepares graduates for expanded roles in the provision of primary care to children and adolescents. Courses focus on theories and clinical application related to health promotion, health and developmental assessment, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and management of common acute and chronic conditions in children and adolescents with a family-centered approach to care. There is an emphasis on the development of evidence-based research skills fundamental to advanced practice nursing.

Each student, throughout the two years, provides primary health care for children and adolescents in a variety of clinical settings, including community-based and private practices as well as school-based health centers. In addition, students select a specialty clinical rotation with relevance to pediatric primary care. In all clinical placements, the role of the PNP as a member of an interdisciplinary team and coordinator across systems of care within the context of family is emphasized. The PNP specialty curriculum is intended to prepare students to apply for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Certification in primary care through the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board or the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 702a, Primary Care I Seminar A
  • 740a, Advanced Pediatric Health Assessment and Clinical Reasoning
  • 741a, Individual and Family Development during Childhood
  • 742a, Primary Care and Health Promotion of Children I Seminar
  • 743a, Primary Care of Children I Clinical Practice
  • 744a, Primary Care of Adolescents Seminar
  • Spring Term
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 745b, Primary Care of Adolescents Clinical Practice; or 753b, School Health Clinical Practice
  • 746b, Primary Care of Children II Seminar
  • 747b, Primary Care of Children II Clinical Practice
  • 755b, Advanced Pediatric Pharmacology
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 745a, Primary Care of Adolescents Clinical Practice; or 753a, School Health Clinical Practice
  • 748a, Primary Care of Children III Seminar
  • 749a, Primary Care of Children III Clinical Practice
  • 754a, Specialty Pediatric Clinical Practice (one term only required, either fall or spring)
  • Spring Term
  • 750b, Primary Care of Children IV Seminar
  • 751b, Primary Care of Children IV Clinical Practice
  • 752b, Chronic Health Conditions in Children and Adolescents
  • 754b, Specialty Pediatric Clinical Practice (one term only required, either spring or fall)

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty

The Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) specialty prepares graduates for advanced practice in the provision of psychiatric–mental health services to individuals across the lifespan and their family members in a variety of settings and roles. Courses focus on theories, research evidence, and clinical application related to mental health assessment and differential diagnosis, psychopathology, psychopharmacology, and psychotherapeutic modalities including individual, group, and family therapy. There is also emphasis on health promotion and risk prevention as students evaluate and monitor comorbid illnesses and conditions occurring with primary psychiatric diagnoses.

Each student, throughout the two years, provides a wide range of services in a variety of clinical settings, which may include acute emergency psychiatric services, community mental health centers, office-based and private practice, home-based care, integrated psychiatric and primary care, substance abuse and forensic sites, and acute and long-term care facilities. Through application of evidence-based research skills, students evaluate systems of care, design evidence-based practice solutions, and work in collaboration with the multidisciplinary team. Upon completion of the required curriculum, students are prepared to apply for certification as a psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner with a lifespan focus through the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Year One
  • Fall Term
  • 600c, Advanced Health Assessment for Entering RN Students
  • 601a, Advanced Pathophysiology
  • 760a, Mental Health Assessment across the Lifespan
  • 761a, Psychopathology across the Lifespan I
  • 763a, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan I
  • 765a, Individual Psychotherapy Seminar I
  • Spring Term
  • 602b, Advanced Pharmacology
  • 604b, Statistics and Research for Evidence-based Practice Nursing
  • 762b, Psychopathology across the Lifespan II
  • 764b, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan II
  • 766b, Individual Psychotherapy Seminar II
  • 767b, Clinical Psychopharmacology across the Lifespan
Year Two
  • Fall Term
  • 605a, Transitions to Professional Practice
  • 606a, Promoting Health in the Community
  • 768a, Clinical Outcome Management in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing Seminar
  • 769a, Group Psychotherapy Seminar
  • 770a, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan III
  • Spring Term
  • 771b, Psychiatric–Mental Health Clinical Practice across the Lifespan IV
  • 772b, Applied Psychopharmacology across the Lifespan
  • 773b, Family Psychotherapy Seminar

The course plan for part-time study can be obtained from the specialty director. A Post-Master’s Psychiatric–Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Certificate option is also available (see the chapter Post-Master’s Certificates).

Diabetes Care Concentration

The Diabetes Care concentration consists of a series of courses that focus on advanced preparation in the subspecialty of diabetes care practice and management. It is designed for students in their final year of study. Students who are enrolled in this concentration are expected to complete the designated seminars and clinical practica.

The concentration is open to students in the Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, and Pediatric Nurse Practitioner specialties. The concentration is designed to prepare specialists in these fields for practice in diabetes care and management.

All students in the concentration are required to take 610a, Advanced Concepts and Principles of Diabetes Care Seminar, and 611a/b, Clinical Practice in Diabetes Care and Management, which requires four hours per week of clinical practice. Enrollment in the concentration is limited. Applications for the concentration are submitted in the spring term of the first specialty year. Faculty permission is required.

Global Health Concentration

The Global Health concentration is designed to prepare students to serve global populations both internationally and domestically as clinicians, educators, scholars, and policy makers. Students are exposed to a range of global concepts through their interdisciplinary didactic courses and through their global clinical and scholarly activities.

All students in the concentration take two approved graduate-level courses in global health, one of which may be 617b, Education and Capacity-Building in Rural Nicaragua, and complete a minimum of 60 additional clinical hours either in an international setting with YSN-approved preceptors or in a domestic site serving global populations.

The concentration is open to students in their final year of study in the M.S.N. program. Enrollment is limited. Students are encouraged to complete a concentration application in their first specialty year.

Oncology Concentration

The Oncology concentration consists of didactic courses and clinical experience to provide a foundation of knowledge and skill for an advanced practice nursing role in the care of patients with cancer. Students enrolled in this concentration are expected to complete the designated seminars and clinical practicum. Opportunities for scholarly activities with faculty will be available and encouraged.

The concentration is open to students in all adult advanced practice nursing programs. Students are required to take 612b, Principles of Advanced Oncology Practice Seminar, in spring of the first year; and 613a/b, Advanced Management of Clinical Problems in Oncology Seminar, and 614a/b, Clinical Practicum for Oncology Nurse Practitioners, in the final year. Students are encouraged to complete a concentration application in their first specialty year.

Research Concentration

The Research concentration is designed to further expose current M.S.N. students to nursing research and foster an interest in future doctoral study. The research practicum not only provides students with research skills but also allows them to help advance faculty research at YSN and in the field.

All students in this concentration take two approved graduate-level Research Seminar courses (615a and 616b). The concentration is open to students in their final year of study in the M.S.N. program.

Applications are available in the spring term of the first specialty year, and students are selected by the end of the spring term. Students are encouraged to speak with the concentration faculty to learn more about this concentration.

Joint Degrees

Joint Degree in Nursing and Divinity

In recognition of the relationship between nursing and religious studies, the Yale School of Nursing and the Yale Divinity School offer a joint-degree program in nursing and divinity. This option is especially oriented to individuals who wish to combine careers in advanced nursing practice and social ministry that might involve direct practice, planning, and policy making and religious ministry in a variety of health care systems. There are two joint-degree options between the Divinity School and the School of Nursing. The first option, a joint degree leading to the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) and the Master of Arts in Religion (M.A.R.), requires three years of study (four years for students in the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing [GEPN]). The second option, a joint degree leading to the M.S.N. and Master of Divinity (M.Div.), requires four years of study (five years for GEPN students) and is designed for those students who wish to prepare for the lay or ordained ministries of Christian churches. Admissions decisions are made independently by the Divinity School and the School of Nursing. Students are required to apply simultaneously to both schools. Applicants must indicate on each application form that they are applying to the joint-degree program. This joint-degree program is not open to YSN students enrolled in or applying to the Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty. All applicants must meet with the associate dean of student affairs and the specialty director prior to applying to discuss the feasibility of the program of study.

Joint Degree in Nursing and Public Health

Recognizing the relationship between nursing and public health, the Yale School of Nursing and the Yale School of Public Health offer a joint-degree program in nursing and public health. This option is especially oriented to individuals who wish to combine careers in advanced nursing practice and public health that might involve direct practice, planning, and policy making in a variety of health care systems in the public health sector. The joint-degree program requires three years of study (four years for students in the Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing) and awards a Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) and a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.). Admissions decisions are made independently by the School of Public Health and the School of Nursing. Students are required to apply simultaneously to both schools. Applicants must indicate on each application form that they are applying to the joint-degree program. This joint-degree program is not open to YSN students enrolled in or applying to the Midwifery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty. All students are required to begin their first academic year at the School of Public Health.

M.S.N./Ph.D. Joint-Degree Program

This joint-degree program combines the two-year Master of Science in Nursing degree from the School of Nursing and the Ph.D. in Nursing from the Graduate School. It allows students to complete requirements for both degrees in five years. Applicants for admission to the joint program must be admitted to both schools. Students typically enter the joint program at matriculation, but M.S.N. students who are completing the Research Concentration may apply to the Ph.D. program while enrolled in the fall of year two of the M.S.N. degree. Upon enrollment, the student is assigned a Ph.D. adviser who will work closely with the student to determine a plan of study, course selection (aligned with the student’s research interests), and the development of research ideas. The first two years of the program are spent in the School of Nursing, completing all requirements for the M.S.N. degree. In the second year, students will complete the Research Concentration, which provides mentored research experience and the development of a research proposal. The M.S.N. Research Concentration will fulfill one half of the first-term Research Assistantship in the Ph.D. program. Students are eligible to take Graduate School courses while enrolled at the School of Nursing, with up to three courses counting toward both degrees. One didactic or clinical course, aligned with the student’s proposed research topic, may count as a cognate course toward the Ph.D. Students may have the opportunity to undertake additional mentored research experiences in the summers following years one and two, including research assistantship hours.

The minimum residence requirement in the program is five years. The tuition requirement is two years in the School of Nursing and three years in the Graduate School. Financial aid is awarded by each school according to its own criteria. While enrolled at the School of Nursing, students are eligible to compete for financial aid available to master’s students, but are not eligible for Graduate School aid. Once they have completed the M.S.N. degree and enroll in the Graduate School in year three, students in the joint-degree program receive a full doctoral financial aid package during those terms in which they are enrolled in the Graduate School, including up to three years of tuition, stipend, and a health award to cover the cost of Yale Health Hospitalization/Specialty Coverage. Students are expected to complete the joint-degree program within six years.

The M.S.N. and Ph.D. degrees are awarded separately, upon completion of the M.S.N. requirements (at the end of the second year of study in the M.S.N program by the School of Nursing), and upon completion of the requirements for the Ph.D. by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. To qualify for the M.S.N. and Ph.D. degrees, students must satisfy all degree requirements of both schools. Any exception to this pattern of study must be approved by the director of graduate studies and the appropriate associate dean.