Undergraduate Programs of Study

Undergraduate Course Listings

Official Yale College course information is found on the Yale Course Search website, https://courses.yale.edu. Official Yale College program information is found in the Yale College Programs of Study, http://catalog.yale.edu/ycps.

African Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Veronica Waweru (203.432.1425, veronica.waweru@yale.edu)

Director of the Program in African Languages

Kiarie Wa’Njogu (309B Luce, 203.432.0110, john.wanjogu@yale.edu)

Professors Lea Brilmayer (Law), John Darnell (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Owen Fiss (Law), Robert Harms (History), Daniel Magaziner (History), Roderick McIntosh (Anthropology), Christopher Miller (African Studies; French), Stephanie Newell (English), Catherine Panter-Brick (Anthropology), David Post (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), Jeremy Seekings (Global Affairs; Visiting), Ian Shapiro (Political Science), Michael Veal (Music), David Watts (Anthropology), Elisabeth Wood (Political Science)

Associate Professors Katharine Baldwin (Political Science), Cécile Fromont (History of Art), Cajetan Iheka (English), Louisa Lombard (Anthropology), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology)

Assistant Professors Jill Jarvis (French), Benedito Machava (History), Nana Quarshie (History), Carolyn Roberts (History)

Lecturers Lacina Coulibaly (Theater Studies), Anne-Marie Foltz (Public Health), David Simon (Political Science), Veronica Waweru (African Studies)

Senior Lectors II Oluseye Adesola (African Studies), Kiarie Wa’Njogu (African Studies)

Senior Lectors Jonas Elbousty (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Matuku Ngame (French)

Lector Nandipa Sipengane (African Studies)

The program in African Studies enables students to undertake interdisciplinary study of the arts, history, cultures, politics, and development of Africa. As a foundation, students in the program gain a cross-disciplinary exposure to Africa. In the junior and senior years, students develop analytical ability and focus their studies on research in a particular discipline such as anthropology, art history, history, languages and literatures, political science, or sociology or on topics such as global health, economic development, or human rights.

African Studies provides training of special interest to those considering admission to graduate or professional schools or careers in education, journalism, law, management, medicine, politics, psychology, international relations, public policy, development work, creative writing, or social work. The interdisciplinary structure of the program offers students an opportunity to satisfy the increasingly rigorous expectations of admissions committees and prospective employers for a broad liberal arts perspective that complements specialized knowledge of a field.

Requirements of the Major

The African Studies program consists of twelve term courses, including (1) one African Studies course in the humanities and one in the social sciences; (2) two years of an African language (Arabic, Kiswahili, Yorùbá, isiZulu, or others with permission of the director of undergraduate studies [DUS]), unless waived by examination; (3) one research methods course, AFST 401 or an alternative course that either serves to deepen the concentration or provide methodological tools for the senior essay, selected in consultation with the DUS; (4) a concentration of four term courses, in a discipline such as anthropology, art history, history, languages and literatures, political science, or sociology, or in an interdisciplinary program such as African American Studies; Ethnicity, Race, and Migration; or Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; or in a cross-disciplinary area such as diaspora studies or development studies; and (5) AFST 491, the senior essay. The required courses represent the core of the program and are intended to expose the student both to the interdisciplinary nature of African studies and to the methodologies currently being brought to bear on the study of African cultures and societies.

Language requirement African Studies majors are required to complete two years of college-level study (or the equivalent) of an African language, and they are encouraged to continue beyond this level. For the language requirement to be waived, a student must pass a placement test for admission into an advanced-level course or, for languages not regularly offered at Yale, an equivalent test of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills administered through the Center for Language Study. Students should begin their language study as early as possible. If the requirement is waived, students must substitute other African Studies courses for the four required language courses.

With permission of the DUS, students may count courses in an additional language, such as French or Portuguese, toward the major requirements. Students are encouraged to include upper-level courses, especially those centering on research and methodology.

Program in African Languages The language program offers instruction in four major languages from sub-Saharan Africa: Kiswahili (eastern and central Africa), Yorùbá (western Africa), Wolof (western Africa), and isiZulu (southern Africa). African language courses emphasize communicative competence, using multimedia materials that focus on the contemporary African context. Course sequences are designed to enable students to achieve advanced competence in all skill areas by the end of the third year, and students are encouraged to spend a summer or term in Africa during their language study.

Courses in Arabic are offered through the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Noncredit instruction in other African languages is available by application through the Directed Independent Language Study program at the Center for Language Study. Contact the director of the Program in African Languages for information.

Senior Requirement

Students are required to complete a senior essay in AFST 491, working under the guidance of a faculty adviser. With prior approval by the DUS, a combined senior essay may be submitted for those pursuing a double major.

A preliminary statement indicating the topic to be addressed and the name of the faculty adviser must be submitted to the DUS by the end of the second week of the fall term in the senior year.

Advising

Students planning to major in African Studies should consult the DUS as early as possible.

M.A. Program

Students in Yale College are eligible to complete the M.A. in African Studies in one year of graduate work if they begin the program in the third and fourth undergraduate years. Students interested in this option must complete eight graduate courses in the area by the time of the completion of the bachelor’s degree. Only two courses may be counted toward both graduate and undergraduate degrees. Successful completion of graduate courses while still an undergraduate does not guarantee admission into the M.A. program.

Courses

AFST 015a/AFAM 016a/ENGL 015a/, South African Writing after Apartheid Stephanie Newell

AFST 092b/THST 092b, African Rhythm in Motion

AFST 128a/ARCG 128a/EGYP 128a/NELC 129a/RLST 251a, Magic and Ritual in Ancient Egypt and the Near East John Darnell

AFST 135b/PLSC 135b, Media and Conflict

AFST 175a/PLSC 175a, Africa in International Relations David Simon

AFST 184a/AFAM 160a/AMST 160a/HIST 184a, The Rise and Fall of Atlantic Slavery Edward Rugemer

AFST 220a/HIST 417a/HSHM 200a, Histories of Confinement: From Atlantic Slavery to Social Distancing Nana Quarshie

AFST 272b/ANTH 272b/ARCG 272b, African Prehistory Jessica Thompson, Roderick McIntosh

AFST 304a/MMES 304a/PLSC 458a, Modern North Africa in Flux

AFST 306a/GLBL 306a, Social Enterprise in Developing Economies II Robert Hopkins

AFST 335b/ER&M 325b/HIST 335b, A History of South Africa Daniel Magaziner

AFST 355b/ANTH 355b/EAST 351b, China-Africa Encounters Helen Siu

AFST 368a/EVST 369a/HIST 366Ja, Commodities of Colonialism in Africa Robert Harms

AFST 396b/HIST 396Jb, Revolutions and Socialist Experiments in Africa Benedito Machava

AFST 412b/AFAM 287b/AMST 465b/FREN 412b/LITR 250b, Postcolonial Theory and Literature Fadila Habchi

AFST 435b/THST 335b, West African Dance: Traditional to Contemporary Lacina Coulibaly

AFST 449a/AFAM 449a/ENGL 378a, Challenges to Realism in Contemporary African Fiction Stephanie Newell

AFST 486a/HIST 374Ja/HSHM 486a, African Systems of Thought Nana Quarshie

AFST 491a or b, The Senior Essay

SWAH 110a, Beginning Kiswahili I Kiarie Wa’Njogu

SWAH 120b, Beginning Kiswahili II Kiarie Wa’Njogu

SWAH 130a, Intermediate Kiswahili I

SWAH 140b, Intermediate Kiswahili II

SWAH 150a, Advanced Kiswahili I Kiarie Wa’Njogu

SWAH 160b, Advanced Kiswahili II Kiarie Wa’Njogu

SWAH 170a, Topics in Kiswahili Literature Kiarie Wa’Njogu

TWI 110a, Beginning Twi I

TWI 120b, Beginning Twi II

YORU 110a, Beginning Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

YORU 120b, Beginning Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

YORU 130a, Intermediate Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

YORU 140b, Intermediate Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

YORU 150a, Advanced Yorùbá I Oluseye Adesola

YORU 160b, Advanced Yorùbá II Oluseye Adesola

YORU 170a, Topics in Yorùbá Literature and Culture Oluseye Adesola

YORU 172b, Topics in Yorùbá Literature and Culture II Oluseye Adesola

WLOF 110a, Elementary Wolof I

WLOF 130a, Intermediate Wolof I

ZULU 110a, Beginning isiZulu I

ZULU 120b, Beginning isiZulu II

ZULU 130a, Intermediate isiZulu I

ZULU 140b, Intermediate isiZulu II

ZULU 150a, Advanced isiZulu I

ZULU 160b, Advanced isiZulu II

East Asian Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Frances Rosenbluth (308 RKZ, 203.432.5256, frances.rosenbluth@yale.edu)

Professors Daniel Botsman (History), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Fabian Drixler (History), Aaron Gerow (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Valerie Hansen (History), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Tina Lu (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Peter Perdue (History), Frances Rosenbluth (Political Science), Helen Siu (Anthropology), Chloë Starr (Divinity), Jing Tsu (East Asian Languages & Literatures; Comparative Literature), Anne Underhill (Anthropology), Arne Westad (History), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professors William Honeychurch (Anthropology), Michael Hunter (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Hwansoo Kim (Religious Studies), Yukiko Koga (Anthropology)

Assistant Professors Lucas Bender (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Jinyi Chu (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Eric Greene (Religious Studies), Denise Ho (History), Daniel Mattingly (Political Science), Quincy Ngan (History of Art), Hannah Shepherd (History), Emma Zang (Sociology)

Senior Lecturer Pauline Lin (East Asian Languages & Literatures)

Lecturers Allison Bernard, Russell Burge, Paula Curtis, Philip Gant, Jooyeon Hahm, Alex Macartney, David Porter, Kyle Shernuk, Tomonori Sugimoto

Senior Lectors II Seungja Choi, Angela Lee-Smith

Senior Lectors Hsiu-hsien Chan, Min Chen, Rongzhen Li, Ninghui Liang, Fan Liu, Kumiko Nakamura, Hiroyo Nishimura, Aoi Saito, Yu-lin Wang Saussy, Jianhua Shen, Mari Stever, Wei Su, Chuanmei Sun, Haiwen Wang, Peisong Xu, Mika Yamaguchi, Yongtao Zhang, William Zhou

Lector Hyun Sung Lim

In the East Asian Studies major, students focus on a country or an area within East Asia and concentrate their work in the humanities or the social sciences. The major offers a liberal education that serves as excellent preparation for graduate study or for business and professional careers in which an understanding of East Asia is essential.

The major in East Asian Studies is interdisciplinary, and students typically select classes from a wide variety of disciplines. The proposed course of study must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUS).

Prerequisite

The prerequisite to the major is completion of study at the L2 level of an East Asian language taught at Yale or the equivalent.

Requirements of the Major

Beyond the prerequisite, the major consists of thirteen course credits, which may include up to six taken in a preapproved program of study abroad. Six course credits must be taken in East Asian language courses, including a course at the L4 level and one year of advanced study (L5) with readings in the East Asian language.

Beyond the language requirement, the major includes seven course credits, six in the country or area of concentration and one outside it. Of the course credits in the area of concentration, one must be in the premodern period, at least two must be seminars, and one is the senior requirement. These courses are normally taken at Yale during the academic year, but with prior approval of the DUS the requirement may be fulfilled through successful course work undertaken elsewhere.

Credit/D/Fail A maximum of one course taken Credit/D/Fail may be counted toward the requirements of the major, with permission of the DUS.

Senior Requirement

During the senior year, all students must satisfy a senior requirement consisting of a major research project that uses Chinese-, Japanese-, or Korean-language materials, reflects an up-to-date understanding of the region, and demonstrates a strong command of written English. This requirement can be met in one of three ways. Students may take a seminar that relates to the country or area of concentration, culminating in a senior thesis. Alternatively, students who are unable to write a senior essay in a seminar may complete a one-term senior essay in EAST 480 or a one-credit, two-term senior research project in EAST 491, 492 culminating in an essay. The adviser for the senior project should be a faculty member associated with the Council on East Asian Studies with a reading knowledge of the target language materials consulted for the essay.

Advising

Selection of courses Upon entering the major, students are expected to draw up an intellectually coherent sequence of courses in consultation with the DUS. They must consult with the DUS each term concerning their course schedules. They should identify as soon as possible a faculty adviser in their area of specialization. As a multidisciplinary program, East Asian Studies draws on the resources of other departments and programs in the University. Students are encouraged to examine the offerings of other departments in both the humanities and the social sciences, as well as residential college seminars, for additional relevant courses. The stated area of concentration of each student determines the relevance and acceptability of other courses. For a complete listing of courses approved for the major, see the Council on East Asian Studies website (http://ceas.yale.edu).

Courses in the graduate and professional schools Qualified students may elect pertinent courses in the Graduate School and in some of the professional schools with permission of the instructor, the EAST DUS, and the director of graduate studies of the relevant department or the dean or registrar of the professional school.

Combined B.A./M.A. Degree Program

Exceptionally able and well-prepared students may complete a course of study leading to the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees after eight terms of enrollment. See “Simultaneous Award of the Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees” in Section K of the Academic Regulations in the Yale College Programs of Study. Interested students should consult the DUS prior to the fifth term of enrollment for specific requirements in East Asian Studies.

Courses

Please consult the course information available online at http://ceas.yale.edu/academics/courses and https://courses.yale.edu for a complete list of East Asian-related courses offered at Yale University.

EAST 030b/HIST 030b, Tokyo Daniel Botsman

EAST 210a/EALL 210a/LITR 172a, Man and Nature in Chinese Literature Kang-I Sun Chang

EAST 240a/CHNS 200a/EALL 200a/HUMS 270a, The Chinese Tradition Tina Lu

EAST 241b/EALL 211b/LITR 174b/WGSS 405b, Women and Literature in Traditional China Kang-I Sun Chang

EAST 242a/EALL 230a/HUMS 269a, Poetry and Ethics Amidst Imperial Collapse Lucas Bender

EAST 243a/EALL 233a/HSAR 417a/HUMS 285a, History of Chinese Imperial Parks and Private Gardens Pauline Lin

EAST 260a/EALL 280a/FILM 307a, East Asian Martial Arts Film Aaron Gerow

EAST 303a/HIST 303Ja, Hong Kong and China: A Cross-Border History Denise Ho

EAST 309b/HIST 309Jb, Uses of the Past in Modern China Denise Ho

EAST 310a/GLBL 309a/PLSC 357a, The Rise of China Daniel Mattingly

EAST 313a/ANTH 213a, Postwar Japan: Ghosts of Modernity Yukiko Koga

EAST 338a/ECON 338a/GLBL 318a, The Next China

EAST 341b/EALL 302b, Readings in Classical Chinese Prose Kang-I Sun Chang

EAST 344a/PLSC 444a, Governing China Daniel Mattingly

EAST 351b/AFST 355b/ANTH 355b, China-Africa Encounters Helen Siu

EAST 358b/EALL 256b/GLBL 251b/HUMS 272b/LITR 265b, China in the World Jing Tsu

EAST 375b/HIST 375b, China from Mao to Now Denise Ho

EAST 391b/EALL 296b/RLST 121b, Religion and Culture in Korea Hwansoo Kim

EAST 474b/HSAR 484b, Japanese Screens Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan

EAST 480a or b, One-Term Senior Essay Frances Rosenbluth

EAST 491a and 492b, Senior Research Project Frances Rosenbluth

Hellenic Studies

Chair

John Geanakoplos (30 Hillhouse Ave., 203.432.3397, john.geanakoplos@yale.edu)

Director

George Syrimis (34 Hillhouse Ave., 203.432.9342, george.syrimis@yale.edu)

Professor John Geanakoplos (Economics)

Lecturers Paris Aslanidis, George Syrimis

Senior Lector Maria Kaliambou

Hellenic Studies is a program of the European Studies Council. The core of the program is the teaching of modern Greek, supplemented with other courses and events related to the study of postantiquity Greece, as well as the society and culture of modern Greece and its interaction with the rest of Europe and the world. Related courses can be found in the listings of Anthropology, History, History of Art, Literature, Political Science, Religious Studies, and Russian and East European Studies. A major in Ancient and Modern Greek is described under Classics in the Yale College Programs of Study. Students who have an interest in postantiquity Greek language, society, or culture are advised to consult with the program director of the Hellenic Studies program.

Courses

MGRK 110a, Elementary Modern Greek I Maria Kaliambou

MGRK 120b, Elementary Modern Greek II Maria Kaliambou

MGRK 130a, Intermediate Modern Greek I Maria Kaliambou

MGRK 140b, Intermediate Modern Greek II Maria Kaliambou

MGRK 151a, Advanced Modern Greek Maria Kaliambou

MGRK 216a/CLCV 216a/LITR 239a/WGSS 209a, Dionysus in Modernity George Syrimis

MGRK 218a/FILM 243a/WGSS 245a, Family in Greek Literature and Film George Syrimis

MGRK 236a or b/PLSC 138a or b/SOCY 221a or b, The Euro Crisis Paris Aslanidis

MGRK 237a/GLBL 215a/LAST 386a/PLSC 375a/SOCY 389a, Populism Paris Aslanidis

MGRK 300b/CLCV 319b/HIST 242Jb/WGSS 293b, The Olympic Games, Ancient and Modern George Syrimis

Latin American Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Ana De La O Torres (115 Prospect St., Rm. 327, 203.432.5234, ana.delao@yale.edu)

Professors Rolena Adorno (Spanish & Portuguese), Ned Blackhawk (History; American Studies), Richard Burger (Anthropology), Carlos Eire (History; Religious Studies), Eduardo Fernandez-Duque (Anthropology), Paul Freedman (History), Aníbal González-Pérez (Spanish & Portuguese), Roberto González Echevarría (Spanish & Portuguese), K. David Jackson (Spanish & Portuguese), Gilbert Joseph (History), Daniel Markovits (Law), Stephen Pitti (History; American Studies), Alicia Schmidt Camacho (American Studies), Stuart Schwartz (History), Claudia Valeggia (Anthropology), Noël Valis (Spanish & Portuguese), Elisabeth Wood (Political Science)

Associate Professors Rodrigo Canales (School of Management), Oswaldo Chinchilla (Anthropology), Ana De La O Torres (Political Science), Marcela Echeverri (History), Anne Eller (History), Moira Fradinger (Comparative Literature), Albert Laguna (American Studies; Ethnicity, Race & Migration)

Assistant Professors Seth Jacobowitz (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Didac Queralt (Political Science), Emily Sellars (Political Science)

Senior Lectors II Margherita Tortora, Sonia Valle

Senior Lectors Sybil Alexandrov, Marta Almeida, María Pilar Asensio-Manrique, Mercedes Carreras, Ame Cividanes, Sebastián Díaz, María Jordán, Rosamaría León, Juliana Ramos-Ruano, Lissette Reymundi, Lourdes Sabé Colom, Bárbara Safille, Terry Seymour

Lector Selma Vital

The major in Latin American Studies is designed to further understanding of the societies and cultures of Latin America as viewed from regional and global perspectives. The Latin American Studies major builds on a foundation of language and literature, history, history of art, theater studies, humanities, and the social sciences; its faculty is drawn from many departments and professional schools of the University.

The major in Latin American Studies is interdisciplinary. With two goals in mind—intellectual coherence and individual growth—the student proposes a course of study that must satisfy the requirements listed below. The proposed course of study must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUS). Though all students choose courses in both the humanities and the social sciences, they are expected to concentrate on one or the other.

Prerequisites

Prerequisite to the major is knowledge of the two dominant languages of the region, Spanish and Portuguese. Depending on their interests, students select one language for two years of instruction and the other for one. Other languages necessary for research may in appropriate circumstances be substituted for the second language with the consent of the DUS. Students are encouraged to meet the language requirements as early as possible. Courses used to satisfy the language prerequisite may not be counted toward the major.

Requirements of the Major

The major itself requires twelve term courses: one introductory course approved by the DUS; eight courses related to Latin America from departmental offerings or from a provided list of electives; two additional electives; and the senior essay, LAST 491. The eight Latin American content courses should include courses from the following categories: two courses in the social sciences (anthropology, economics, or political science); two courses in history; two courses in Spanish American or Brazilian literatures beyond the language requirement; one course in art, architecture, film and media studies, music, or theater studies; and one seminar in any area related to Latin American Studies. Students wishing to count toward the major courses that do not appear in the program’s course offerings should consult with the DUS.

Students must enroll in three seminars or upper-level courses during their junior and senior years. Elective seminars must be approved by the DUS, who can provide a list of appropriate courses.

Senior Requirement

The senior essay is a research paper written usually in one term in LAST 491. Students choose their own topics, which may derive from research done in an earlier course. The essay is planned in advance in consultation with a qualified adviser and a second reader.

In preparing the senior essay, Latin American Studies majors may undertake field research in Latin America. Students are encouraged to apply for summer travel grants through the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies to conduct field research for their senior thesis. The Albert Bildner Travel Prize is awarded to an outstanding junior who submits an application in Spanish or Portuguese in addition to the English application essay. Information about these and other grants is available on Yale’s Student Grants & Fellowships website (http://studentgrants.yale.edu).

Advising

A list of courses intended as a guide to students in preparing their programs is available at the office of the DUS and on the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies website (http://clais.macmillan.yale.edu). Qualified students may also elect pertinent courses in the Graduate School and in some of the professional schools with permission of the director of graduate studies or professional school registrar and the DUS.

Study Abroad

Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of study abroad opportunities during summers or through the Year or Term Abroad program.

Electives within the Major

Students wishing to count toward the major courses that do not appear on this list should consult with the DUS.

AMST 317a/ER&M 353a/HIST 323Ja, Race, Radicalism, and Migration in Latinx History Stephen Pitti

ECON 325b/EP&E 321b/GLBL 322b/PLSC 185b/SAST 281b, Economics of Developing Countries: Focus on South Asia

ER&M 200b, Introduction to Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Alicia Schmidt Camacho

ER&M 300a or b, Comparative Ethnic Studies Quan Tran [F], Fadila Habchi [Sp]

EVST 020a, Sustainable Development in Haiti Gordon Geballe

HIST 467Ja/HSHM 422a, Cartography, Territory, and Identity William Rankin

LAST 030b/ANTH 030b/ARCG 030b, Inca Culture and Society Richard Burger

LAST 222a, Legal Spanish Mercedes Carreras

LAST 223a/SPAN 223a, Spanish in Film: An Introduction to the New Latin American Cinema Margherita Tortora

LAST 227a/SPAN 227a, Creative Writing María Jordán

LAST 232a/ANTH 232a/ARCG 232a, Ancient Civilizations of the Andes Richard Burger

LAST 243a/SPAN 243a, Advanced Spanish Grammar

LAST 251b/EP&E 257b/PLSC 399b, Political Power and Inequality in Latin America Ana De La O Torres

LAST 253b/HIST 253Jb, Dissidence and Control in Early Modern Spain and Its Empire

LAST 266a, Studies in Latin American Literature I Rolena Adorno

LAST 267b/LITR 258b/SPAN 267b, Studies in Latin American Literature II Roberto González Echevarría

LAST 293b/ER&M 293b/HIST 393Jb, History and Culture of Cuba Albert Laguna

LAST 318b/ARCH 341b/GLBL 253b/URBN 341b, Globalization Space Keller Easterling

LAST 334b/ER&M 364b/HIST 334Jb, Ethnicity, Nationalism, and the Politics of Knowledge in Latin America Marcela Echeverri

LAST 343a/SPAN 343a, Humor in Contemporary Spanish American Narrative Anibal González-Pérez

LAST 361a/HIST 361a, History of Brazil Stuart Schwartz

LAST 385a/LITR 260a/PORT 385a, Brazilian Novel of the Twenty-First Century K. David Jackson

LAST 386a/GLBL 215a/MGRK 237a/PLSC 375a/SOCY 389a, Populism Paris Aslanidis

LAST 391b/LITR 289b/SPAN 392b, Literature of the Americas, North and South Rolena Adorno

LAST 423a/EP&E 243a/GLBL 336a/PLSC 423a, Political Economy of Poverty Alleviation Ana De La O Torres

PLSC 415a/EP&E 241a/SOCY 172a, Religion and Politics in the World Katharine Baldwin

SPAN 246b, Introduction to the Cultures of Spain

LAST 471a, Directed Reading

LAST 491a or b, The Senior Essay

Modern Middle East Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies [F]

Jonathan Wyrtzen (493 College St., Rm. 307, 203.432.5172, jonathan.wyrtzen@yale.edu)

Director of Undergraduate Studies [Sp]

Kaveh Khoshnood (LEPH, Ste. 826, 203.785.2920, kaveh.khoshnood@yale.edu)

Professors Abbas Amanat (History), Gerhard Bowering (Religious Studies), John Darnell (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Stephen Davis (Religious Studies), Steven Fraade (Religious Studies), Eckart Frahm (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Frank Griffel (Religious Studies), Christine Hayes (Religious Studies), Hannan Hever (Comparative Literature), Marcia Inhorn (Anthropology), Anthony Kronman (Law), J.G. Manning (Classics; History), Ivan Marcus (History), Alan Mikhail (History), A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management; Economics), Robert Nelson (History of Art), Kishwar Rizvi (History of Art), Maurice Samuels (French), Shawkat Toorawa (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Harvey Weiss (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Associate Professors Zareena Grewal (American Studies), Kaveh Khoshnood (Public Health), Eliyahu Stern (Religious Studies), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology), Travis Zadeh (Religious Studies)

Assistant Professors Thomas Connolly (French), Robyn Creswell (Comparative Literature), Samuel Hodgkin (Comparative Literature), Jill Jarvis (French), Elizabeth Nugent (Political Science), Eda Pepi (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Evren Savci (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies)

Senior Lecturers Geetanjali Singh Chanda (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Supriya Gandhi (Religious Studies),Tolga Köker (Economics), Kathryn Slanski (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Lecturers Karla Britton (Architecture), Nicholas Lolito (Political Science), Emma Sky (Global Affairs)

Senior Lector II Shiri Goren

Senior Lectors Sarab Al Ani, Muhammad Aziz, Jonas Elbousty, Dina Roginsky, Farkhondeh Shayesteh

Lectors Ozgen Felek, Orit Yeret

The Modern Middle East Studies major focuses on the culture, history, religion, politics, and society of the modern Middle East in its full geographical breadth, while developing expertise in any of the major languages associated with the region, namely Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish. Courses are drawn from departments in the humanities and social sciences, including Anthropology, History, History of Art, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology. The Modern Middle East Studies major gives students the analytic and linguistic skills necessary to master the complex issues of the Middle East and serves as excellent preparation for graduate study or for professional careers in which an understanding of that region is essential.

Requirements of the Major

The major allows students to develop highly individualized courses of study, tailored to their own academic, intellectual, and linguistic interests. There are no prerequisites. Twelve term courses are required for the major, including one course at the L5 level in a Middle Eastern language and two survey courses on the modern period, taken at the introductory level. Beyond those requirements, students take eight distribution courses focusing on any aspect of the culture, thought, history, religion, politics, and society of the region. These eight distribution courses must be spread geographically and temporally and include two courses from two different regions or countries within the Middle East, two courses from different departments or programs, and two that focus substantially on the period before 1750. These courses must draw from distinct methodological or disciplinary approaches and must include at least two advanced seminars. Up to two language courses below L5 in a modern Middle Eastern language may count toward the distribution requirement with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS). The proposed course of study also requires DUS approval.

Senior Requirement

Students in the major undertake a one- or two-term senior essay that involves use of materials in one or more modern Middle Eastern languages. Each student selects a faculty adviser with competence in the appropriate language. A prospectus and outline signed by the adviser must be submitted to the DUS by the end of the fourth week of classes in either term of the senior year. Senior essays are graded by the adviser and a second reader. See the course descriptions of the senior essay courses (MMES 491, 492, 493) for further information. Alternatively, under supervision of the instructor, majors may take an additional seminar and write an essay in that course to fulfill the senior requirement.

Courses

MMES 121a/PLSC 121a, International Relations of the Middle East Nicholas Lotito

MMES 126b/ARCH 271b/HSAR 266b/SAST 266b, Introduction to Islamic Architecture Kishwar Rizvi

MMES 140a/ARBC 131a, Intermediate Levantine Arabic I Sarab Al Ani

MMES 141b/ARBC 141b, Intermediate Levantine Arabic II Sarab Al Ani

MMES 144a/HIST 346a, Making of Modern Iran Abbas Amanat

MMES 148b/HIST 345b/JDST 265b/RLST 202b, Jews in Muslim Lands from the Seventh to the Sixteenth Century Ivan Marcus

MMES 149a/ER&M 219a/HIST 219a/JDST 200a/RLST 148a, Jewish History and Thought to Early Modern Times Ivan Marcus

MMES 150a/HEBR 150a/JDST 213a, Advanced Modern Hebrew: Daily Life in Israel Orit Yeret

MMES 157b/JDST 306b/NELC 157b, Israeli Narratives Shiri Goren

MMES 161a/HEBR 162a/JDST 319a, Israel in Ideology and Practice Dina Roginsky

MMES 162b/HEBR 169b/JDST 403b, Languages in Dialogue: Hebrew and Arabic Dina Roginsky

MMES 168b/HEBR 158b/JDST 305b, Contemporary Israeli Society in Film Shiri Goren

MMES 170b/ARBC 168b, Modern Arab Writers Muhammad Aziz

MMES 191a/RLST 100a, Introduction to World Religions Gerhard Bowering

MMES 215b/ENGL 191b/HUMS 206b/LITR 318b/NELC 201b, The Arabian Nights, Then and Now Robyn Cresswell

MMES 235b/JDST 235b/NELC 231b/RLST 147b, Introduction to Judaism in the Ancient World: From Temple to Talmud Steven Fraade

MMES 271a/GLBL 271a, Middle East Politics Emma Sky

MMES 304a/AFST 304a/PLSC 458a, Modern North Africa in Flux

MMES 305a/EVST 305a/GLBL 301a, Environmental Security in the Middle East Kaveh Madani

MMES 342b/HIST232Jb/HUMS 443b/JDST 270b/RLST 201b, Medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims In Conversation Ivan Marcus

MMES 364b/PLSC 396b, Politics of the Contemporary Middle East Elizabeth Nugent

MMES 370a/RLST 226a/SOCY 368a, Transnational Islam and Muslim Communities

MMES 391a/RLST 287a, Islamic Theology and Philosophy Frank Griffel

MMES 399b/430b/ANTH 441b/WGSS 430b, Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East Eda Pepi

MMES 456a/HSAR 456a, Art and Politics in the Modern Middle East Kishwar Rizvi

MMES 491a or b, Senior Essay

MMES 492a and 493b, The Yearlong Senior Essay

Russian and East European Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Jinyi Chu (Arnold Hall A33, 203.432.1302, jinyi.chu@yale.edu)

Language Coordinator

Irina Dolgova (Arnold Hall A36, 203.432.1307, irina.dolgova@yale.edu)

Professors Sergei Antonov (History), Edyta Bojanowska (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Paul Bushkovitch (History), Katerina Clark (Comparative Literature; Slavic Languages & Literatures), John Gaddis (History), Harvey Goldblatt (Slavic Languages & Literatures), John MacKay (Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies), Timothy Snyder (History)

Associate Professors Molly Brunson (Slavic Languages & Literatures), Jason Lyall (Political Science), Douglas Rogers (Anthropology), Marci Shore (History)

Assistant Professors Marijeta Bozovic (Slavic Languages & Literatures; Film & Media Studies; Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Marta Figlerowicz (Comparative Literature; English)

Senior Lectors II Irina Dolgova, Constantine Muravnik

Senior Lectors Krystyna Illakowicz, Julia Titus, Karen von Kunes

The major in Russian and East European Studies, administered by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of a broad region: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, the Caucasus, and Central Asia; Poland, Hungary, the Czech and Slovak Republics, and other areas in east central Europe; and the Balkans. The program is appropriate for students considering careers in international public policy, diplomacy, or business, and is also suited to students wishing to continue academic work.

Requirements of the Major

Thirteen term courses taken for a letter grade are required for the major. Students must take one course in Russian or East European history selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies (DUS). If Russian is presented as the primary language to satisfy the requirements of the major, then all East European language courses and third- and fourth-year Russian courses count toward the major. If an East European language other than Russian is presented as the primary language, then all courses in that language designated L3 or higher count toward the major. Electives are chosen in consultation with the DUS from an annual list of offerings. Electives must include at least one course in a social science. Other undergraduate courses relevant to Russian and East European Studies, including residential college seminars, may also count toward the major if approved by the DUS.

Languages A full understanding of the area demands knowledge of its languages. Students must demonstrate either proficiency in Russian or intermediate-level ability in an East European language. Students may demonstrate proficiency in Russian by (1) completing fourth-year Russian (RUSS 160, 161); (2) passing a written examination to demonstrate equivalent ability; or (3) completing a literature course taught in Russian and approved by the DUS. Students may demonstrate intermediate-level ability in an East European language by (1) completing a two-year sequence in an East European language (currently Czech, Polish, Romanian, or Ukrainian; students interested in studying other East European languages should contact the DUS); or (2) passing a language examination demonstrating equivalent ability. Students are encouraged to learn more than one language.

Senior Requirement

Every major must write a senior essay in RSEE 490, 491. At the beginning of the senior year, students enroll in RSEE 490 and arrange for a faculty member to serve as senior adviser. By the third Friday of October, majors submit a detailed prospectus of the essay, with bibliography, to the adviser. A draft of at least ten pages of the text of the essay, or a detailed outline of the entire essay, is due to the adviser by the last day of reading period of the fall term. The student provides the adviser with a form that the adviser signs to notify the DUS that the first-term requirements for the senior essay have been met. Failure to meet these requirements results in loss of credit for RSEE 490. The senior essay takes the form of a substantial article, no longer than 13,000 words, excluding footnotes and bibliography. Three copies of the essay are due in the Slavic departmental office by April 9, 2021. A member of the faculty other than the adviser grades the essay.

Advising

Qualified students may elect pertinent courses in the Graduate School with the permission of the instructor, the director of graduate studies, and the DUS.

Graduate Work The European and Russian Studies program does not offer the simultaneous award of the B.A. and M.A. degrees. However, students in Yale College are eligible to complete the M.A. in European and Russian Studies (with concentration in Russia and eastern Europe) in one year of graduate work. Students interested in this option must complete eight graduate courses in the area by the time they complete the bachelor’s degree. Only two courses may be counted toward both the graduate degree and the undergraduate major. Successful completion of graduate courses while still an undergraduate does not guarantee admission into the M.A. program. Students must submit the standard application for admission to the M.A. program.

Study Abroad

Students should be aware of opportunities for study and travel in Russia and eastern Europe. The DUS can provide information on these programs and facilitate enrollment. Students who spend all or part of the academic year in the region participating in established academic programs usually receive Yale College credit, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of study abroad opportunities during summers or through the Year or Term Abroad program. Students wishing to travel abroad as part of the major should consult the DUS.

Courses

RSEE 225a/HIST 290a, Russia from the Ninth Century to 1801 Paul Bushkovitch

RSEE 240b/CZEC 246b/FILM 364b, Milos Forman and His Films Karen von Kunes

RSEE 241a/HIST 240Ja, Government, Law, and Society in Modern Russia, 1853–1953 Sergei Antonov

RSEE 271a/HIST 271a/HUMS 339a, European Intellectual History since Nietzsche Marci Shore

RSEE 337a/RUSS 337a, The Invention of Tradition in Post-Soviet Nation States Katerina Clark

RSEE 350a/ENGL 198a/FILM 394a/LITR 409a/WGSS 394a, Internet Cultures, Histories, Networks, and Practices Marijeta Bozovic

RSEE 390a/HIST 237a/RUSS 241a, Russian Culture: The Modern Age Sergei Antonov

RSEE 490a and RSEE 491b, The Senior Essay Jinyi Chu

Related Courses That Count toward the Major

Students are encouraged to examine the offerings in Slavic Languages and Literatures and other departments, as well as residential college seminars, for additional related courses that may count toward the major.

South Asian Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Sarah Khan (213 RKZ, 203.432.5687, sarah.khan@yale.edu)

Language Program Director

Swapna Sharma (222 Luce, 203.432.9341, swapna.sharma@yale.edu)

Professors Akhil Amar (Law), Sunil Amrith (History), Tim Barringer (History of Art), Veneeta Dayal (Linguistics), Nihal de Lanerolle (School of Medicine), Michael Dove (Anthropology; School of the Environment), Robert Jensen (School of Management), A. Mushfiq Mobarak (School of Management; Economics), Kaivan Munshi (Economics), Kishwar Rizvi (History of Art), Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan (Anthropology; School of the Environment), Shyam Sunder (School of Management), Steven Wilkinson (Political Science)

Associate Professors Rohit De (History), Mayur Desai (Public Health), Zareena Grewal (Ethnicity, Race & Migration)

Assistant Professors Subhashini Kaligotla (History of Art), Sarah Khan (Political Science), Priyasha Mukhopadhyay (English)

Senior Lecturers Carol Carpenter (Anthropology; School of the Environment), Supriya Gandhi (Religious Studies)

Lecturer Hugh Flick, Jr. (Religious Studies)

Senior Lectors Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma

Lector Aleksandar Uskokov

Librarian Brandon Miliate (South Asia)

The program in South Asian Studies combines the requirements of a discipline-based first major with significant course work in South Asian Studies. South Asian Studies can be taken only as a second major. The major is intended to provide students with a broad understanding of the history, culture, and languages of South Asia, as well as the region’s current social, political, and economic conditions. Work in a discipline-based major coupled with a focus on South Asia prepares students for graduate study, employment in nongovernmental organizations, or business and professional careers in which an understanding of the region is essential.

Requirements of the Major

In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the primary major, a student choosing South Asian Studies as a second major must complete seven term courses in South Asian Studies numbered 200 or above. At least two of the seven courses must address premodern South Asia, and at least two should be seminars. Students may petition the director of undergraduate studies (DUS) to include one relevant course from another department or program; approval may require additional course work on South Asian topics. Students must also complete the senior requirement and meet the major’s language requirement.

Language requirement One South Asian language must be studied at the advanced level (L5). Students who matriculate with advanced proficiency in a South Asian language (excluding English), as demonstrated through testing, are encouraged to study Sanskrit, or to study a second modern language through Yale courses or the Directed Independent Language Study program. Students may request substitution of another appropriate language (e.g., Persian or Arabic) for the core language requirement, and they are encouraged to pursue intensive language study through courses or work abroad.

Credit/D/Fail A maximum of one course taken Credit/D/Fail may count toward the major.

Senior Requirement

The senior requirement may be fulfilled by completion of a seminar that culminates in a senior essay. Alternatively, the requirement may be fulfilled by completion of a one-credit, two-term senior research project in SAST 491, 492, or by completion of a one-credit, one-term directed study in SAST 486 that culminates in a senior essay. The senior essay should be a substantial paper with a maximum length of 8,000 words for one term and 10,500 words for two terms. The use of primary materials in the languages of the region is encouraged in senior essay projects. The DUS must approve senior essay plans early in the student’s senior year.

Advising

The South Asian Studies major permits students to choose courses from a wide range of disciplines. Individual programs should have a balance between courses in the humanities and those in the social sciences. The proposed course of study must be approved each term by the DUS. Students should also identify an adviser from the South Asian Studies faculty in their area of specialization as early as possible.

Two majors Permission to complete two majors must be secured from the Committee on Honors and Academic Standing. Application forms are available from the residential college deans and must be submitted prior to the student’s final term.

Courses in the Graduate School Graduate courses in South Asian Studies are open to qualified undergraduates. Course descriptions appear in the online Graduate School bulletin (http://catalog.yale.edu/gsas) and are also available in the South Asian Studies program office. Permission of the instructor and of the director of graduate studies is required.

Study Abroad

Up to three course credits from approved study abroad programs may be applied toward the requirements of the major, with permission of the DUS.

Courses

HNDI 110a, Elementary Hindi I

HNDI 120b, Elementary Hindi II

HNDI 130a, Intermediate Hindi I

HNDI 132a, Accelerated Hindi I

HNDI 140b, Intermediate Hindi II

HNDI 142b, Accelerated Hindi II

HNDI 150a, Advanced Hindi

HNDI 160a, Modern Hindi Literature

HNDI 198a or b, Advanced Tutorial

SAST 226b/HIST 314Jb, The Environmental History of South and Southeast Asia Sunil Amrith

SAST 266b/ARCH 271b/HSAR 266b/MMES 126b, Introduction to Islamic Architecture Kishwar Rizvi

SAST 280a/HIST 342a/RLST 180a, Mughal India, 1500–1800 Supriya Gandhi

SAST 281b/ECON 325b/EP&E 321b/GLBL 322b/PLSC 185b, Economics of Developing Countries: Focus on South Asia Zachary Barnett-Howell

SAST 306a/ANTH 322a/EVST 324a, Environmental Justice in South Asia K. Sivaramakrishnan

SAST 334a/ER&M 433a/HIST 363Ja, Mobile South Asians and the Global Legal Order Rohit De

SAST 344b/PLSC 377b/WGSS 397b, Political Economy of Gender in South Asia Sarah Khan

SAST 384b/ARCH 324b/URBN 324b, The City Before and After the Tubewell Anthony Acciavatti

SAST 469a/HSAR 414a, Visual Storytelling in South Asia Subhashini Kaligotla

SAST 491a and SAST 492b, Senior Essay

SKRT 110a/LING 115a, Introductory Sanskrit I Aleksandar Uskokov

SKRT 120b/LING 125b, Introductory Sanskrit II Aleksandar Uskokov

SKRT 130a/LING 138a, Intermediate Sanskrit I Aleksandar Uskokov

SKRT 140b/LING 148b, Intermediate Sanskrit II Aleksandar Uskokov

SKRT 150b, Advanced Sanskrit: Readings in Indian Philosophy and Aesthetics Aleksandar Uskokov

SKRT 160b, Advanced Sanskrit: Readings in Poetry and Drama Aleksandar Uskokov

Southeast Asia Studies

Chair

Erik Harms (10 Sachem St., 203.436.4276)

Program Manager

Kristine Mooseker (311 Luce, 203.432.3431, kristine.mooseker@yale.edu)

Professors Michael Dove (School of the Environment; Anthropology), J. Joseph Errington (Anthropology), Benedict Kiernan (History), James Scott (Political Science), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professor Erik Harms (Anthropology)

Assistant Professor Alka Menon (Sociology)

Senior Lecturers Carol Carpenter (School of the Environment; Anthropology), Amity Doolittle (School of the Environment)

Lecturer Quan T. Tran (American Studies)

Curator Ruth Barnes (Art Gallery)

Senior Lector II Quang Phu Van (Vietnamese)

Senior Lectors Dinny Risri Aletheiani (Indonesian), Indriyo Sukmono (Indonesian)

The Council on Southeast Asia Studies offers an interdisciplinary program that brings together faculty and students sharing an interest in Southeast Asia and contributes to the curriculum with language courses, a weekly seminar series, periodic conferences, cultural events, and special lectures. Yale maintains extensive library and research collections on Southeast Asia, including online archives of periodicals and newspapers from all parts of the region.

Yale does not offer a degree in Southeast Asia studies, but majors in any department may consult with council faculty regarding a senior essay on a Southeast Asian topic, and in certain circumstances students who have a special interest in the region may consider a Special Divisional Major. Students interested in pursuing field research or language study in Southeast Asia may apply to the council for summer fellowship support.

Courses featuring Southeast Asian content are offered each year within a variety of departments, including Anthropology, Environmental Studies, History, History of Art, Music, Philosophy, and Political Science. A list of courses for the current year can be obtained through the council office or departmental website.

Language instruction at all levels is offered in two Southeast Asian languages, Indonesian and Vietnamese. Other Southeast Asian languages may be available in any given year via video conference through the Yale Shared Course Initiative. Check the Southeast Asia Studies language studies page on the SEAS website for updated information. The Council on Southeast Asia Studies supports language tables and independent study in other Southeast Asian languages through the Directed Independent Language Study Program.

Courses

BURM 110a, Elementary Burmese I

BURM 120b, Elementary Burmese II

INDN 110a, Elementary Indonesian I

INDN 120b, Elementary Indonesian II

INDN 130a, Intermediate Indonesian I Dinny Risri Aletheiani

INDN 140b, Intermediate Indonesian II Dinny Risri Aletheiani

INDN 150a, Advanced Indonesian I

INDN 160b, Advanced Indonesian II

INDN 170a, Advanced Indonesian: Special Topics Dinny Risri Aletheiani

INDN 180b, Research and Creative Project on Indonesia Dinny Risri Aletheiani

INDN 470a and 471b, Independent Tutorial Dinny Risri Aletheiani

KHMR 110a, Elementary Khmer I

KHMR 120b, Elementary Khmer II

KHMR 130a, Intermediate Khmer I

KHMR 140b, Intermediate Khmer II

VIET 110a, Elementary Vietnamese I Quang Phu Van

VIET 120b, Elementary Vietnamese II Quang Phu Van

VIET 132a, Accelerated Vietnamese Quang Phu Van

VIET 142b, Accelerated Vietnamese II Quang Phu Van

VIET 160a, Advanced Vietnamese II Quang Phu Van

VIET 220b/ER&M 209b/LITR 279b, Introduction to Vietnamese Culture, Values, and Literature Quang Phu Van